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schaakhamster 46 ( +1 | -1 )
benko gambit in the next round of my otb-clubchampionship I'm playing a player who play's the benko gambit against d4... as I just recently switched to d4 as white, I have only have played against the benko gambit once here on gk... there I accepted the second pawn (bxa6) and didn't really felt comfortable with the opening... it seemed to me black got all the fun!... now I looked into the b6-line and I rather like it... anybody like to give some more insight?
ccmcacollister 190 ( +1 | -1 )
huh? b6?! And some general comments ...b6? Wondering if you mean the g3 or variation where the K will go to g2? Or the mainline where WT plays b3 well into the opening. (Or something else perhaps?)
Personally, I do like to play the mainline as WT where he allows the Bf1 to be taken upon that square, as I had a good impression of the line last time I looked it over. Of course that may have been a decade ago :)
If you like the looks of the line with g3, it might interest you to look into the line where WT plays the more aggressive g4 instead, to precipitate king-side expansion and attack. I saw JF Campbell, an Expert, play it once in corr and it looked quite interesting to me. Another idea to test your opponent is to delay your bxa6 until either: he has used an extra tempo by playing Bb7, or until you Have to take or else lose a pawn. Also, sometimes a push to a4 and Nb5 type set-up can be made difficult for BL. (At least, if -I- am BL it can be :)
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Some GM's I've seen involved in Benko games, besides Benko: Lev Alburt, Larry Christiansen.
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[ IF you ever get the chance, playing a Benko Gambit Reversed is GREAT fun as the WT (Benko-like) side of it. You would never regret the attempt! ]
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My impression of the opening overall is that WT difficulties result if he allows BL to invade the WT squares at c4, d3, and of course b3, a2 :) effectively. Which can result from a ...c4 push and attempting knight infiltration via Nc5. My own corr games with the opening have usually resulted in draws in the Accepted lines. Declined lines can also be interesting where WT plays for a center punch, rather than letter BL have all the fun. In my games as WT, the extra pawn hasnt seemed to mean that much, and I can't recall winning due directly to an extra endgame pawn. Instead success has come from Central or Kingside attack. Or simply BL errors.
There may be ideas from the Volga Gambit, Kurjatko gambit, and Kasparov's handling of the ...Bg4 Pirc that can be imported for use.
Have fun.
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}8-)
schaakhamster 7 ( +1 | -1 )
I mean 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 d5 b5 4 cxb5 a6 5 b6

but I surely will take your comments in for consideration =)
alberlie 41 ( +1 | -1 )
the b6 line is ok, I guess... All I know about it though is to secure your knight as fast as possible on c4. Trying to do that you should play Be2 first and just then Nf3 since otherwise your opponent can trade you knight via Bg4. Once Nc4 is in, consider a4 at some time, thus further securing your knight.
That's about all I know and I got severly punished both as black and white. I simply avoid it by playing e4 :o)
ccmcacollister 19 ( +1 | -1 )
Groovy ... Thanks schaakhamster, for the info! It is a completely new line, to me. Just when they said there was nothing new in Chess . . . :))
alberlie 13 ( +1 | -1 )
look here... -> www.chesscorner.com
nottop 107 ( +1 | -1 )
benko problems I believe there are serious problems with the Benko in the fianchetto line where white plays a quick Rb1 and then (if circumstances warrant) a fast a4. I've seen attempts to resurrect the black positions (with odd lines like an early Qa6), but I don't think these are adequate. I've stopped playing the Benko as black (and I used to love the Benko). I think many have stopped playing the Benko.
The specific line I think is a problem is
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 Bxa6 6.g3 g6 7.Nc3 d6 8.Bg2 Bg7 9.Nf3 Bbd7 10.Rb1

It is difficult for black to prove adequate compensation for the pawn. White is not afraid of giving the pawn back in return for black's bishop on g7 (and an overwhelming position). I've seen some odd lines and am playing one now in an important event (olympiad finals - against a strong player). In that game my opponent played a recommended line involving a quick Bb7 and Qa6 - but I don't think he is happy with his game.

This Rb1 line is a serious challenge to the Benko and I see no reason for white players to seek anything else until someone comes up with some sort of improvement for black.

schaakhamster 3 ( +1 | -1 )
thanks I'll take that in account...